London LASER 23

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18 Oct 2017

6.30pm to 9pm

LASER: Talks on the intersection of art, science and technology

The event is free but please book to reserve a place.

 

London LASER presents an evening of talks on art and science interactions: with Charissa Terranova on polymathy; Andrew Carnie and Alexa Wright on ‘Hybrid Bodies’; and Gemma Anderson on ‘Representing Biology as Process’.

 

In the talk “Wide Awake! An Exploration of Twentieth-Century Polymathy in British Art-Science-Design,” writer and educator Charissa N. Terranova studies the genealogy of the term “polymathy.” She hews closely to its Indo-European root –mendh, meaning “to learn,” and related words such as the Lithuanian mandras, or “wide-awake,” and the German munter, or “awake, lively” to unite geneticist Conrad Waddington, embryologist Joseph Needham, entrepreneur-cum-designer Jack Pritchard, architect Walter Gropius, and painter and set-designer Yolanda Sonnabend. Associate Professor of Aesthetic Studies at the University of Texas at Dallas, Terranova’s most recent book is Art as Organism: Biology and the Evolution of the Digital Image (2016).

 

Andrew Carnie and Alexa Wright will introduce ‘Hybrid Bodies’, a long-term, multidisciplinary research project that brings together the arts, ethics, medicine and social sciences to investigate the complexities of heart transplantation (an exhibition of work created as part of this project is on show at London Gallery West from 16 October-16 November, 2017). Andrew Carnie is an artist and academic. His artistic practice involves interaction with neurologists and other medical scientists. The work is often time-based, involving slide projection using dissolve systems or video projected onto complex screen configurations. Alexa Wright is an artist and Reader in Visual Culture at University of Westminster. Alexa uses a wide range of media in her work, including photography, video, sound, interactive installation, performance, objects and books. Many of her projects involve collaborations with medical scientists and/or people with medical conditions or disabilities.

 

Artist and researcher Gemma Anderson will introduce her work in the context of the current AHRC project ‘Representing Biology as Process’ she is working on with Biologist James Wakefield and Philosopher John Dupré at the University of Exeter. Anderson has collaborated on a number of innovative art/science projects including ‘Hidden Geometries’ with the Mathematics Department at Imperial College London; ‘Isomorphology’ and the ‘Cornwall Morphology and Drawing Centre’ with the Natural History Museum, London; and ‘Portraits: Patients and Psychiatrists’ (Wellcome Trust Arts Award 2009) in collaboration with psychiatrists and patients at Bethlem Royal Hospital. Her work has been exhibited at the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Freud Museum and the Wellcome Collection, London. Her new book Drawing as a Way of Knowing in Art and Science (Intellect Press) will be launched in October 2017.

 

Image: A Tender Heart, Andrew Carnie, 2014