Screen Writes Symposium

Screen Writes Symposium

27 Jun 2014

10am

'Screen Writes'
A one-day symposium sponsored by LCC, HEA-ADM and the Writing PAD network.

Date: Friday, June 27, 2014
Start Time: 10.00 am
Location: London College of Communication Room T304 (Tower Block)

Background
The 'Screen Writes' Symposium to be held on 27 June at LCC will explore the purposes and practices of writing as practice for BA students engaged in visual communication, including graphic design, advertising and animation. The idea of a symposium has sprung from the new writing and blogging course for Level 1 students at the London College of Communication (Mark Ingham, with Andrea Mason, Linda Stupart, Andrew Slatter and Harriet Edwards): this will be critically analysed. The emphasis more generally is on writing practices emergent from studio concerns in line with the ethos of the Writing PAD project and its subsequent network. There will be time to discuss and exchange across roles and institutions in this symposium.

The 'Screen Writes'  symposium is intent on exploring a number of interconnected areas related to graduate attributes. 

 
Firstly, the role of creative writings in relation to voice and identity through the daily and weekly practice of making the student's writing public using online presences, in this case a practice/theory blog. This allows the students to see writing as going from being a fairly passive, summatively driven activity, to one that is in constant formation.

Secondly, it will explore the inherent mix that writing has with image and graphics in visual communication practices. This includes the surveying of tools and techniques employed when using online presences and how these can be used in such things as peer-to-peer learning. The idea that design and media students are writing with images will be analysed and challenged at this symposium. It will explore the possibilities of writing from images, writing with images, writing to images and writing against images. The beaten paths of these long and often debated relationships in academic writing will be taken off track to see if the cliches that surround these interactions in academia can be torn apart and reworked into more productive dynamic exchanges.

Thirdly, the potential of such practices to create a presence in social medias with a view to professional purposes, or how blogging, and indeed tweeting, can link the students to communities and prospective avenues beyond the university, will be scrutinised.  Students have been encouraged to think about their online presences in a number of ways. As a digital note book/sketchbook where ideas can be drafted, edited, reworked and published. It also made the students think about who they were writing for in a professional context.

Fourthly, the articulation of the place, and merit of such practices within the wider design curriculum will be discussed. This will be in relation to employers wanting to see, not only a finished portfolio website that is demanded by the profession and academia, but a blog type site that also show the thinking, mistakes and the processes through to the making of final works.

Programme

10.00  Coffee
10.30  Introduction to the day, Mark Ingham
11am   Writing as a creative activity for BA design (workshop,) Andrea Mason and Andrew Slatter
12.00  The pedagogy of creative writing – in the context of design  (talk), Andrea Mason
12.30   Graphic design and writing, Andrew Slatter
1pm  Lunch
1.45  "eRTFs" (Enriched Text Formats) Online, continuous and present writing in Art and Design Contextual & Theoretical lessons, Mark Ingham
2.30 The Myth of Creativity: How 'creative writing' in arts and design courses fails as effective/affective to, Linda Stupart
3pm Tea break
3.30 Screens and writes: what kinds of intelligences? Harriet Edwards
4-5 Discussion and exchange in small group; final feedback

We have some space for participants outside LCC itself to write-up their own practice OR responses to the day, with images or as a visual essay for Writing PAD Journal of Writing in Creative Practice (Intellect).

Free but please book

Attendance is free of charge with preference being given to staff in HE institutions and FE colleges across the UK. Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis. Lunch and refreshments will be provided, but travel expenses will not be covered. However, the HEA is currently running a funding scheme to support travel crossing national borders to attend events, which could be applied for independently. For more information visit the HEA UK Travel Fund.

We have 32 places available on this day.

To book a place, please email:

Dr Harriet Edwards
hedwards@csm.arts.ac.uk
(Journal Editor)

Or: Dr Mark Ingham
m.ingham@lcc.arts.ac.uk